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Renewable Energy » Tidal Resource Characterization and Modelling

The Vectron2 Project: Turbulence Measurements for the In-stream Tidal Energy Industry

March 2019 – March 2021

The Vectron is a new sensor used for measuring turbulence velocity within a tidal turbine’s swept area.  The Vectron has been successfully prototyped, where next steps are to take the technology to the ‘industry-ready’ stage of development and the focus of this project.

Renewable Energy » Tidal Resource Characterization and Modelling

How Does Sound Travel in High Energy Environments? Effectiveness of Acoustic Monitoring Systems and Turbine Audibility Assessment

April 2017 – September 2020

The researchers are designing and implementing a long-term acoustic monitoring program to support tidal energy development in the Bay of Fundy. Specialized acoustic instrumentation was deployed for a two-month period in Grand Passage to advance understanding how turbulence affects the ability to

Renewable Energy » Tidal Resource Characterization and Modelling

Reducing Costs of Tidal Energy through a Comprehensive Characterization of Turbulence in Minas Passage

October 2017 – December 2019

Turbulence is a significant issue at every site being considered for in-stream tidal energy development.

Renewable Energy » Tidal Resource Characterization and Modelling

Multi-Scale Turbulence Measurement in the Aquatron Laboratory

July 2018 – May 2019

This project has two primary objectives - to characterize the flow and turbulence in the Aquatron facility pool tank using turbulence sensors calibrated against a traceable standard; and to test technologies for investigating the horizontal variability of turbulence in real-world tidal channels.

Renewable Energy » Tidal Resource Characterization and Modelling

Remote Acoustic Measurements of Turbulence in High-Flow Tidal Channels during High Wave Conditions

April 2018 – April 2019

Many of the high-flow tidal channels targeted for worldwide in-stream hydro-electric development are impacted by surface gravity waves incident from a large exterior basin (e.g. the Bay of Fundy/Gulf of Maine/North Atlantic).

Renewable Energy » Tidal Resource Characterization and Modelling

Turbine Wake Characterization

November 2017 – March 2019

Turbine wake characterization is a key endeavour to the development of in-stream tidal turbine arrays.  In a sense, a turbine’s footprint includes its wake, wherein flow speeds are less and turbulence is elevated compared to the ambient surroundings.  It is thus desired to not just delineate wake

Renewable Energy » Tidal Resource Characterization and Modelling

Going with the Flow II: Using Drifters to Address Uncertainties in the Spatial Variation of Tidal Flows

October 2017 – June 2018

Drifters are one of the oldest, simplest and most reliable methods for measuring ocean currents. Drifters also provide a simple, low risk platform from which to gather acoustic information along flow streamlines or ‘drift tracks’.

Renewable Energy » Socio-economic and Traditional Use » Socioeconomic Studies

Nova Scotia Small Tidal Test Centre: Gap Analysis and Business Case

November 2017 – March 2018

As the tidal energy industry develops, there is increasing interest in the prospects for small-scale tidal energy development. Building small-scale tidal energy installations has promise given the number of locations where they can be used.

Renewable Energy » Tidal Resource Characterization and Modelling

Turbulence Dissipation Rates from Horizontal Velocity Profiles at Mid-Depth in Fast Tidal Flows

December 2017

This study characterizes the turbulence in a tidal channel in the Bay of Fundy that has been identified for development as a tidal power resource.

Renewable Energy » Tidal Resource Characterization and Modelling

Going with the Flow: Advancement of Drifting Platforms for use in Tidal Energy Site Assessment & Environmental Monitoring

April 2015 – August 2017

This research project aimed to apply a simple and low cost philosophy to ocean observation by developing an inexpensive low-profile surface drifter for use in initial assessment of potential tidal energy development opportunities.  The project addressed limitations in the existing drifter design